Every video below features real patient-ventilator interactions created using the ASL 5000™ Breathing Simulator and a real ventilator. These videos are just a few examples of what the ASL 5000 is capable of; please review our End Users and Training Applications resource for a larger scope of possibilities. The ASL 5000 enables educators to provide hands-on mechanical ventilation training with high-fidelity patient-ventilator interactions – any ventilator and any mode of ventilation.

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COPD Exacerbation and Air-Trapping

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The patient is awake and breathing spontaneously on volume control mode. The patient is having a COPD exacerbation and experiencing hypercapnic respiratory failure. The ventilator is alarming because the peak inspiratory pressures (PIP) are over 40 cmH2O. The flow waveforms are showing clear evidence of air-trapping. The ventilator is pressure limiting because it is in volume control mode. As a result, the tidal volumes are not reaching the set volume of 500.

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Post-Op Patient Waking from Sedation

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The patient is being fully supported by the ventilator in volume control mode. This is a post-op appendectomy patient previously healthy and currently unresponsive to all stimuli. The ventilator is showing a stable, apneic patient with a healthy minute ventilation.

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The patient is beginning to wake up from sedation on volume control mode. The patient is breathing spontaneously and taking large tidal volumes. The ventilator is alarming for high minute ventilation.

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The patient’s spontaneous breathing trial on pressure support mode is looking successful. The patient’s effort, rate and minute ventilation are trending down to normal values.

ARDS Patient and ARDSnet Protocol

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The patient is sedated and breathing spontaneously on volume control mode. The patient has ARDS and the ventilator is showing clear evidence of double triggering/ breath stacking. On this ventilator, an empty waveform represents a mandatory breath and a filled-in waveform represents a patient-triggered breath.

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The patient’s sedation is beginning to wear off causing agitation and deterioration. The ventilator is on volume control mode and is showing a dysynchrony and alarms for high rate, high peak pressures, and high minute ventilation.

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ARDSnet protocol is being initiated and sedation is being increased. The patient is beginning to get more comfortable.

Cycle Dysynchrony and Double Trigger

The patient is on volume control mode. The ventilator is showing a cycle dysynchrony/ double trigger.

Air-Trapping

The patient is on volume control mode. The ventilator is showing an expiratory dysynchrony with air-trapping.

Severe Asthma Patient

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The patient has severe asthma and is breathing over the ventilator on volume control mode. The ventilator is showing an inspiratory dysynchrony, high peak pressures, an I:E ratio of 1:1 and air-trapping.

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The patient has severe asthma and the ventilator is being switched from volume control mode to pressure control mode. The ventilator is showing the patient becoming more synchronous. The peak pressures are no longer exceeding alarm limit and the I:E ratio improved to 1:2.

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The patient has severe asthma and is on pressure control mode. A continuous nebulizer has decreased the severity of the asthma exacerbation. Due to the patient’s improved condition, the ventilator is alarming for high tidal volumes and minute ventilation alarms.

COPD Exacerbation and Trigger Dysynchrony

The patient is experiencing a COPD exacerbation and is on volume control mode. The ventilator is showing a trigger dysynchrony issue in the pressure and flow waveforms.

Inspiratory Hold and Expiratory Hold

The patient is experiencing septic shock and is on volume control mode. The inspiratory hold maneuver is showing a plateau pressure of 15 cmH2O. The expiratory hold maneuver is showing an auto-PEEP that displays some evidence of air trapping.

COPD Exacerbation and BiPAP

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The patient is experiencing a COPD exacerbation and is on BiPAP. The patient’s work of breathing is being alleviated by setting the change in pressure to 10 cmH2O.

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The patient is less dyspneic and the respiratory rate has decreased from 26 to 20 with increased settings.

Trauma Patient and SIMV

The patient has been in the ICU for 6 days due to trauma and has been awake and on SIMV for 24 hours. The ventilator shows the difference between the mandatory breaths and the spontaneous breaths of the patient.

Spontaneous Breathing Trials

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The patient is undergoing a spontaneous breathing trial and is failing as the Rapid Shallow Breathing Index is too high.

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The patient is undergoing a spontaneous breathing trial and is succeeding as the Rapid Shallow Breathing Index is in a healthy range.


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