During the COVID-19 Pandemic, We Are Committed to You

Stefan Frembgen, President/CEO of IngMar Medical

As the COVID-19 pandemic impacts those around the world, we recognize this is a time filled with feelings of uncertainty. However, at this time, we are immensely grateful for those in the respiratory community. We would like to extend our sincere thanks to you.

  • Thank you to the engineers who develop respiratory devices and treatments.
  • Thank you to the educators who train future clinicians on ventilation.
  • Thank you to the researchers who find the best treatment modalities.
  • Thank you to those providing care to people in need.

You are the reason we do what we do every day at IngMar Medical. During this difficult time, we stand by you. You have our commitment to continue providing the products and services you depend on.

For more than 25 years, IngMar Medical has focused on our mission to decrease suffering and improve patient outcomes. This enduring mission guides us as we begin to invest our time in assisting the respiratory community in this period of need.

Currently, we are developing a simulation scenario for managing a ventilated COVID-19 patient. We are working with Laerdal Medical and various physicians and respiratory therapists throughout the world so that we can gain a broad perspective on how these patients are best managed on ventilators. The scenario will be shared with all users when complete. Keep an eye out for updates on this in the coming days.

Please continue to reach out to IngMar Medical for your respiratory simulation needs. Be well.

412-441-8228 | support@ingmarmed.com | sales@ingmarmed.com

Ventilator Management Training: Who, What, and How?

Mechanical ventilation is a life-saving treatment for critically ill patients. As ventilators become increasingly sophisticated, the work of clinicians responsible for their management does not necessarily become easier. A new textbook on mechanical ventilation lists 298 mode names on 36 ventilators in the United States alone. In addition, hospitals have several different ventilators, each with multiple options for modes of ventilation. This is a major challenge for ensuring clinical competency from patient admission to discharge.

Who?

In the United States, respiratory therapists serve as the experts in mechanical ventilation. However, many other clinicians interact with the patient during their scope of care and therefore need to be trained in ventilation.

Here is a list of disciplines within an organization that can benefit from ventilation training:

  • Respiratory Therapists
  • Pulmonologists
  • Anesthesiologists
  • Neonatologists
  • Intensivists
  • Critical Care Physicians
  • Emergency Medicine Physicians
  • Nurses (ICU, ER)
  • Nurse Anesthetists
  • Nurse Practitioners
  • EMT/ Paramedics
  • Physiotherapists
  • Physician Assistants
  • Perfusionists

What? Laurel Students learn RespiSim System

Due to the number of clinicians who interact with a patient during their scope of care, ventilation training needs to cover a wide range of scenarios including: airway management, non-invasive ventilation, initiation of mechanical ventilation and how to properly ventilate apneic or spontaneously breathing patients with differing disease states and evolving patient conditions.

Here are a few main topics that should be covered in ventilation training:

  • Patient-Ventilator Interactions (patient-ventilator synchrony issues)
  • Ventilator Adjustments (Spontaneous Breathing Trials)
  • Ventilator Maneuvers (Finding optimal PEEP)
  • Types/ Modes of Ventilation (NIV, APRV, PAV, ASV, PRVC, etc.)
  • Patient Assessments (Hemodynamics)
  • Patient Conditions (ARDS, COPD, Asthma, etc.)

Please review our End Users and Training Applications resource.

How?

Typically, ventilation training is accomplished through textbooks and classroom discussion. Simulation may be integrated, but is usually less effective when using a standard test lung with limited functionality and realism. However, with the right equipment, simulation has the potential to be the most effective course of action to standardize and improve ventilation training.

Simulation offers:

  • Structured, repeatable simulations
  • Deliberate practice and experiential learning with mistakes
  • Customized, appropriately challenging training 
  • Low frequency, high risk patient scenarios
  • Hands-on teamwork and communication practice
  • No risk to patients

To accomplish the most high-fidelity ventilation simulations, we recommend a lung that simulates patient-ventilator interactions indistinguishable from a real patient, such as the ASL 5000™ Breathing Simulator. With this kind of realism, training can be expanded to include simulations of the following patient-ventilator interactions:

  • Highly realistic ventilator waveforms
  • Relevant and timely ventilator alarms
  • Both synchronous and dysynchronous patients
  • Air-trapping
  • Spontaneous Breathing Trials
  • Non-invasive ventilation
  • Impact of evolving patient conditions

Please review our ASL 5000 Patient-Ventilator Interactions web page.

If you are interested in learning more about how the ASL 5000 can enhance your respiratory training, please contact sales@ingmarmed.com.